How to burn salt water as fuel

In the ultimate quest to save money, people often look at how to save or reduce their gasoline consumption. There has been a lot of buzz about promising technologies like HHO, or burning salt water as a fuel instead of gas. First, let me be very clear; HHO technology is nothing more than a scam. Many HHO venders use pseudo-scientific explanations and videos of electric cars (which don’t use HHO) as a well to sell their fake gas-saving product on the unsuspecting masses. But this article isn’t about HHO; it’s about burning sea-water as fuel.

About 70% of the planet’s surface is covered with salt water. This means that if there were a way to burn the sea-water and use it as a fuel, it would completely solve all of the world’s energy problems. There has been a lot of buzz about an invention by John Kanzius. His invention uses radio waves to actually burn saltwater. The chemistry is a bit complicated, but for now, it’s confirmed that 14 MHz signals do indeed ignite saltwater.

This is great, isn’t it? Well, there is no such thing as a free lunch. Unfortunately, the amount of power needed to generate the radio waves exceeds the amount of power produced by burning the saltwater. Unless an even newer technology is developed, this means that it is impossible to generate any power from seawater. It’s an unfortunate truth, but it is what it is. So the next time to you a Youtube video about the saltwater torch, just remember that an enormous amount of electricity is used to generate the flames, and that electricity has to come from somewhere! While it was an interesting discovery, it is extremely unlikely that this technology will ever be able to power cars, power plants, or anything else. Save your money and don’t buy any fuel savings devices that claim to work by burning saltwater.

Posted under Avoiding Scams, Saving Gas, Technology

This post was written by admin on March 1, 2009

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Fake videos promoting the HHO Scam explained

To sell a product successfully, people need to know about the product to begin with. This is equally true for scams. The HHO scam is highly successful for many reasons. One of the reasons the HHO scam is successful is because of its use of pseudo scientific lingo coupled with people who aren’t properly educated in science, at least in the fields of chemistry, electricity and thermodynamics. The advertising methods used by the HHO scammers depend on the fact that most people in the US do not have engineering or science related college degrees.

Confusion about hydrogen

Hydrogen is the most common element in our galaxy. Hydrogen has many interesting properties and is used in many different ways by many different types of technology. First, let me briefly explain the technology behind HHO.

HHO in motor vehicles – Massive amounts of electricity is used to separate hydrogen and oxygen molecules from water. This gas is fed directly into the gas lines leading to your car engine. The new oxygen levels trick your car’s onboard computer into running lean. This damages the engine, but also increases your miles per gallon. If you want to destroy your car engine, or have a car which is going to die within a year anyway, HHO may actually save you some money.

Hydrogen in fuel cells – Unlike the HHO scam, fuel cells is a promising technology. The majority of this technology was developed by NASA in preparation for the Apollo program. Hydrogen in fuel cells is a vastly different technology than HHO. The idea behind fuel cells is that a device recombines hydrogen and oxygen to form water and electricity. This electricity is most often used to drive an electric motor. Even though fuel cell technology has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with HHO, the scammers promoting HHO post videos of fuel cell cars, and then proceed to claim that the cars are using HHO ‘technology’ when, in fact, nothing could be further from the truth.

HHO torches – This technology is similar to HHO in the respect that the gas combination of hydrogen and oxygen is burned to produce a flame. Like HHO, these devices use electrolysis to separate hydrogen out of water. Unfortunately, the similarities end there. There are many sites claiming to make your car run on water, when in fact it is still running on gasoline. HHO torches don’t use gas at all, but just use massive amounts of electricity. The reason these torches are not mainstream is because it is often cheaper for companies to buy and operate regular welding torches, rather than pay for electricity. Of course, the HHO scammers don’t care. They continue to publish videos on Youtube and other sites claiming that cars can run solely on HHO gas just like the torches. The truth is that your car’s alternator can’t supply enough electricity to create enough hydrogen to even operate a lawnmower, much less a car.

Solar power – Solar power has nothing to do with hydrogen or HHO, but that doesn’t stop scammers from posting videos about solar powered cars, and then continue to say that the cars operate using HHO. This is one of the most egregious lies from people promoting HHO just to make a quick dollar.

In summary, there are very different technologies listed above which have nothing to do with HHO. However, HHO scammers post video after video of these devices and claim that HHO is being used in the video. Does this sound like legitimate advertising to you? The answer is no. Its false advertising at best and blatant lying at best.

Why are there so many videos promoting HHO on Youtube? The answer is simple. Most of the major HHO websites have an affiliate program. When you sign up for an affiliate program, you are encouraged to post bogus videos about HHO on Youtube over and over again, and include your affiliate ID in the video comment section.

Posted under Avoiding Scams, Saving Gas, Saving Money, Technology

This post was written by admin on September 17, 2008

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